2 - 3 Mile Walks

A selection of easy walks - all of them ranging from 2 to 3 miles in length.

  • Avocet Line: Exmouth to Lympstone - 2.3 miles (3.8 km)

    Exe Estuary Trail: Photographer Gary Holpin
    Easy

    A gentle stroll mostly along the Exe Estuary cycle route following the eastern bank of the Exe Estuary, whose mudflats, sandbanks and marshes are of international importance for their wildlife, especially the tens of thousands of resident and migratory waterbirds. Look out for avocets, curlews and lapwings, and if you've lucky seals and otters, and buzzards wheeling overhead. Take time to explore Lympstone before catching the train back to Exmouth .

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  • Baggy Point Easy Access Walk - 2.8 miles (4.5 km)

    Whale bone washed up on Croyde beach in 1915. Photographer Jennifer Rowlandson, Tiverton.
    Easy

    A short easy walk out to the tip of Baggy Point and back again, taking in spectacular views of the coastline towards Bideford Bay and Hartland. Children will love the whale bones and the old wreck post, as well as the rocks and cliffs. A good walk in spring, when seabirds nest on the cliff among the clumps of pink thrift and spotted white sea campion and the gorse bushes are ablaze. In autumn the migrant birds gathering ready for their journey south sometimes attract...

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  • Barnstaple - Short Estuary Walk - 2.9 miles (4.6 km)

    Barnstaple Bridge. Photographer Mike Mayor
    Easy

    A walk as long or as short as you want to make it, mostly on a level tarmac path along the Taw Estuary. Look out for wildfowl and waterbirds as you walk past saltmarsh and tiny rocky beaches to the Tarka Inn. For dedicated walkers, the route continues through a once-bustling port and around marshland reclaimed from the sea, to Braunton Burrows, the UK's largest dune system with a wealth of rare plants. They are all excellent walks in autumn, when migrant waders and...

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  • Bossington Landscape Walk - 2.4 miles (3.9 km)

    Selworthy Sands below Bossington Hill. Photographer Dennis Harker, Somerset.
    Easy

    An easy stroll along the halfway path around Bossington Hill, giving extensive views over the dramatically flat marsh and farmland of Porlock Vale, a landscape of national importance because of the rare flora and fauna which flourish here.

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  • Cawsand & Polhawn Forts - 6.2 miles (10.0 km)

    Rame Head. Photographer Charlotte Stanford, Shevington
    Challenging

    A high walk around the fishtail headlands of the Rame peninsula, from Kingsand on the Plymouth Sound to the delightfully-named Wiggle Cliff above Whitsand Bay. The route, passing some of the extensive Victorian fortifications built on Plymouth's Western Approaches to protect Plymouth Sound and the Naval Dockyards, will appeal particularly to anyone interested in military history. Look out to sea, on a clear day, to see the Eddystone lighthouse.

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  • Church Ope Cove - 2.6 miles (4.2 km)

    Easy

    A short walk exploring Portland's north-eastern shoreline, where dramatic cliffs with breathtaking views along the Jurassic Coast tower over a landscape that has slithered downhill, creating a haven for wildlife. The limestone grasslands are alight with creeping plants and the vividly-coloured butterflies and moths that they support, and the scree-clad slopes are littered with boulders that have fallen from the cliffs, many of them containing shells and fossils. The route, along the path of a railway once used for transporting stone, passes a number...

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  • Crock Point - 2.2 miles (3.5 km)

    Looking down on Woody Bay from the SWCP,North Devon. Photographer Ann Fuller,Somerset.
    Easy

    A short walk around Crock Point, with views across the tiny cove below to Duty Point Tower, above Lee Abbey, returning through peaceful woodland past gently flowing streams with splashing waterfalls. A lovely area in spring, when the woods are carpeted with bluebells and stitchwort and full of birdsong. This part of the coastline is a Site of Special Scientific Interest because of its trees and lichens and its bird population.

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  • Hannafore Point - 2.7 miles (4.4 km)

    Sunrise Over Looe Photographer Rosie Spooner
    Easy

    From the large car park at Millpool, through West Looe, out to Hannaford Point and beyond. This is a gentle, mainly level walk on good surfaces. When the road ends beyond Hannaford, then the Coast Path continues for a couple of fields through two gates before the path becomes very difficult for wheelchairs and pushchairs. The fields are eminently passable with short grass and a reasonably level surface. Back in West Looe, there is one section where the coast path goes up some steps but...

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  • Heddon's Mouth - 2.2 miles (3.5 km)

    Heddons Valley. Photographer Emma Barrett, Gosport
    Easy

    A gentle stroll through ancient woodland bright with fresh leaves and wildflowers in the springtime, along a babbling stream to a tiny secluded shingle beach strewn with boulders and shadowed by steep, scree-clad hillsides, with dramatic cliffs of geological importance and tales of smugglers and U-boats. Children of all ages will love the rugged terrain, as well as the beach and the ruined limekiln. A stunning walk in autumn, when the trees start to turn and birds and small mammals rummage in the fallen leaves...

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  • Holdstone Down - 2.3 miles (3.7 km)

    Combe Martin Bandstand Photographer Rob Kendall (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Easy

    A short walk through a high-level wilderness with ancient settlements, plans for an ambitious Victorian housing estate which fortunately came to nought, and a history of spaceships and extra-terrestrial forces. UFO-spotters regularly gather on the summit of this 'holy mountain' and children will love the mysterious pebble arrows often left around the cairn by 'alien' visitors. An atmospheric walk in autumn, when the rust-coloured bracken is interspersed with banks of purple heather and the last of the butterflies browse among the brambles.

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  • Legacy Trail 1 - Around Lorton Meadows - 2.3 miles (3.7 km)

    Riviera Hotel at Bowleaze Cove  Photographer Andrew Child (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Easy

    Go for a wildlife wander around Lorton Meadows nature reserve – and take a step back in time with old fashioned hay meadows, lightly grazed pasture, mature hedgerows, small copses, dew ponds and seasonal streams.

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  • Lynton and the Valley of Rocks - 2.9 miles (4.7 km)

    Castle Rock, Valley of the Rocks. Photographer Emma Barrett, Gosport.
    Easy

    A classic easy walk along a relatively level section of high cliffs between Lynton and the spectacular Valley of Rocks. Children will love the stories associated with the spectacular rock formations, and the herd of friendly feral goats. A good walk in autumn, when the crisp rust-coloured bracken of the heathland is punctuated with banks of purple heather and vivid gorse.

    It is also a good walk for dogs. Have a look at our Top Dog Walks on the South West Coast Path for more...

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  • Maer Cliff - 2.1 miles (3.4 km)

    Easy

    A leisurely amble over Maer Down between two sandy beaches, on good paths with fine sea views over the rocky reefs and offshore islets. The cliffs are of geological importance and the nearby nature reserve is internationally recognised as as an important resting and feeding site for migratory birds blown in by fierce Atlantic gales. Despite its frequent exposure to the weather, the grassland above the cliffs is vivid with bright wildflowers in summer, and Crooklets Beach has full facilities. Both beaches are excellent for...

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  • Otter Valley Wildlife Walk - 2.7 miles (4.4 km)

    Budleigh rocks in the sun Photographer Jonathan Neale (2013 Photo Competition entry)
    Easy

    An easy stroll through the breathtakingly beautiful Lower Otter Valley with its wonderful diversity of wildlife. The valley is managed as a nature reserve, and there are hides and viewing platforms along the river, as well as an abundance of information en route. Look out for dragonflies and kingfishers, moths and butterflies, frogs and fish, ducks and waders. An especially good walk for younger children, who will love the abundance of wildlife and the many viewing places. A pleasure in autumn, whne the leaves start...

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  • Padstow and Prideaux Place - 3.0 miles (4.8 km)

    St Enodoc Church. Photographer Jennifer Rowlandson, Tiverton.
    Easy

    With views over the River Camel, this short but enjoyable walk heads inland from Harbour Cove and passes the Tudor Mansion of Prideaux Place on the way back into Padstow. A good walk in autumn, when the stubble of the fields above Harbour Cove provides rich pickings for migrant birds such as bunting, wheatear and pipit. Look out for merlins hunting them, overhead, or the high-speed dive of a peregrine.

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  • Porthoustock & St Keverne - 3.7 miles (5.9 km)

    Porthoustock, The Lizard. Photographer Colin Milner.
    Easy

    A short walk around a much-quarried coastline where the unusual geology supports a number of rare plants, including Cornish heath. The notorious Manacles rock reef offshore has claimed many lives over the centuries, while inland the tiny village of St Keverne achieved its own fame as the birthplace of not one but two historical Cornish rebellions!

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  • Rame Head Chapel - 2.0 miles (3.3 km)

    Rame Head. Photographer Charlotte Stanford, Shevington
    Easy

    A high headland with a bird's-eye view of the coast for a long way in both directions, Rame Head has long been a lookout point. Celtic warriors built a rampart across the neck of the headland to defend it from possible attack, and medieval monks kept a light burning here to warn sailors of the rocks after St German established their chapel in the Dark Ages. This is a short loop around the headland, which is a great place for bird-spotting, especially in autumn...

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  • Smugglers Inn - Osmington and Osmington Mills - 2.6 miles (4.2 km)

    Jurassic Rock Pools (Fossil Hunting country!) at Osmington Mills. Photographer Fern Richardson, Cambridge.
    Easy

    A short circuit around Osmington and Osmington Mills, taking in a short stretch of Dorset's ancient Ridgeway in a feast of history from the earliest prehistoric times. Flint tools have been found up on the high ridge dating back 500,000 years - and the route also passes a World War Two pillbox.

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  • St Aldhelm's Chapel - 2.8 miles (4.5 km)

    Towards Chapman Pool. Photographer Deborah Sheppard, Thatcham.
    Easy

    A mostly gentle stroll on the high plateau of land above St Aldhelm's Head on the Isle of Purbeck, visiting the thirteenth century chapel on the headland and the Coastwatch lookout beside it. St Aldhelm was a seventh-century Bishop of Sherborne with a habit of singing his sermons in order to draw in a reluctant congregation, but the history of the area stretches from long before his time and there are Bronze Age barrows on the high ground. There are also tremendous coastal views...

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  • St Catherine's Castle - 2.6 miles (4.2 km)

    taking a break Photographer p. reddick (2013 Photo Competition entry)
    Easy

    A short walk around a strategically important headland on the River Fowey, used to defend the estuary and harbour for over two thousands years. With terrific views out to sea, the walk passes the remains of the castle built by Henry VIII and modified during the Crimean War and again in the Second World War. It also visits two small and secluded coves before heading up a woodland path past Daphne du Maurier's 'Manderley'.

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  • St Peter the Poor Fisherman - 2.7 miles (4.3 km)

    National Trust Stoke Point. Photographer Melanie Pohu, Ivybridge.
    Easy

    A short walk to the ancient church of St Peter the Poor Fisherman, perched above the rocks near Stoke Beach and said to date back to Saxon times. Seals are sometimes seen on the rocks at Stoke Point, and pods of dolphins have been spotted offshore in the summer.

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  • Struddicks - 2.7 miles (4.4 km)

    Struddicks, Seaton. Photographer David McIntyre, Plymouth.
    Easy

    A short but fairly demanding route climbing high above the cliffs at Struddicks, giving spectacular views over land and sea. Thanks to the conservation strategies used by the National Trust and landowners the area is brimming with wildlife and bright with flowers and butterflies in the summer months.

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  • Teignmouth Seafront to Smugglers Lane - 2.5 miles (4.1 km)

    'Out to pasture over Dawlish' was taken on the coast path between Dawlish and Teignmouth. Photographer Carol Loak, Bedford.
    Easy

    A walk along a stretch of the sea wall from Teignmouth to Smugglers Lane with a mile of stunning views from the Coast Path in each direction. 

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  • The River Taw - 2.4 miles (3.8 km)

    Easy

    Rock Park with its formal lawns and shrubs and its riverside tree walk was given to the town in 1879 by William Frederick Rock, a shoemaker's son whose early career in banking was blighted by his habit of writing poetry during working hours. He founded a printing business instead, and proceeded to make a fortune, most of which he gave to Barnstaple. The River Taw is still tidal at this point, and many waterbirds nest along its banks.

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  • Torridge Ships & Shipbuilding - 3.0 miles (4.8 km)

    Appledore looking back to Instow. Photographer Stuart Tormey.
    Easy

    Leaving from Bideford Quay, stroll along the shoreline of the River Torridge to the delightful fishing village at Appledore, where the North Devon Maritime Museum offers some fascinating insights into the rich shipbuilding and seafaring history of the area. After passing some elegant riverside houses with private moorings, there are glimpses through the trees of the ribs and hulls of boats and barges in all states of preservation from brand new to rotten. As you reach Appledore you pass the still-thriving shipyard, with a long...

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  • Cadgwith and Poltesco - 2.6 miles (4.1 km)

    Rugged rocks and calm sea. Enys Head on the Lizard. Photographer Dan Adler, Israel.
    Easy

    A walk over tranquil heathland affording spectacular views, between two picturesque fishing coves still displaying the pilchard cellars and capstan houses of their bustling past. Beside the colourful shingle in Carleon Cove, formed of pink granite, banded gneiss, and red and green serpentines, toads hop around the fringes of a millpond. Brown trout jump for flies in the mill leat which was the waterway of a major Victorian serpentine factory.

    This walk is particularly good for dogs as it passes a beach and pub where...

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  • Falmouth Docks Station - Town Walk - 2.0 miles (3.2 km)

    This was taken whilst walking around the beautiful headland of Pendennis Point which overlooks Falmouth. Photographer Myghal-Jon Stevens, Devon.
    Easy

    An easy stroll with just one hill to be climbed, this walk takes you from the bustle of the world's third deepest natural harbour to the tranquil nature reserve and Site of Special Scientific Interest over the hill in Swanvale. Here, in a unique lagoon slumbering at the mouth of a wetland brimming with wildlife, Britain's only Trembling Sea Mat flourishes beneath waters inhabited by dozens of waterbirds and wildfowl, including swans and moorhens.

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  • Falmouth Town Station - Falmouth Packet - 2.0 miles (3.2 km)

    Falmouth Foe. Photographer Joanna Beard.
    Easy

    In 1688 Falmouth was appointed as the Royal Mail packet station, using swift and lightly-armed ships to carry mail and messages to all corners of the Empire, and the service remained based in the town until 1850, when the reliability of the new steamships operating from London took over from the romance of the sailing vessels in England's second port. This gentle stroll around the town links some of the important landmarks around the time of the packet ships.

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  • Frenchman's Creek - 2.7 miles (4.3 km)

    Helford Village, Cornwall Photographer Chris Parker (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Easy

    A short walk through woodland and farmland above a remote, romantic creek on the southern side of the Helford River. Beside Frenchman's Creek it is easy to imagine that the call of a waterbird is really the whistle of Daphne du Maurier's French hero, summoning his English mistress to his Breton pirate ship, and that the lapping of the waves is the sound of his first mate rowing in to fetch her. At Kestle Barton, an ancient Cornish farmstead above the creek, there...

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  • Gwithian Towans - 2.3 miles (3.8 km)

    The view towards Godrevy Lighthouse from Gwithian
    Easy

    A brief stroll across the dunes (the Gwithian Towans) to the village of Gwithian, where the church replaces two earlier chapels that were both engulfed in sand. The whole area is a Site of Special Scientific Interest for the geology and wildlife that have both been created by sand driven in by Atlantic storms, and places once buzzing with industrial activity associated with mining are now tranquil Local Nature Reserves.

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  • Kynance Cove - 2.9 miles (4.7 km)

    Kynance Cove, Cornwall Photographer steve rumming (2013 Photo Competition entry)
    Easy

    A gentle stroll to one of Britain’s most spectacular coves, whose red and green serpentine rocks are as beautifully carved and polished by the sea as the Victorian stoneware once produced by the Poltesco factory just around the coast. The walk follows the path through the rare Cornish heath above the cove to Tor Balk, where there are spectacular views down over Kynance's island trio: Asparagus Island (where wild asparagus grows), Gull Rock and the pointed mitre of The Bishop. Best visited on...

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  • Kynance Cove & Lizard Village - 2.9 miles (4.7 km)

    Kynance Cove, Cornwall Photographer steve rumming (2013 Photo Competition entry)
    Easy

    A gentle stroll from Kynance to Lizard village, whose festive air is matched by full facilities. Returning through the rare Cornish heath above Kynance Cove, the walk visits one of Britain’s most spectacular coves, where the red and green serpentine rocks are as beautifully carved and polished by the sea as the Victorian stoneware once produced by the Poltesco factory just around the coast. From Tor Balk, to the west of the beach, there are spectacular views down over Kynance's island trio: Asparagus...

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  • Pendeen Watch & Portheras Cove - 2.8 miles (4.5 km)

    Portheras Cove near Pendeen. Photographer Matthew Dyer, Radstock.
    Easy

    A gentle amble through fields and heathland, starting from Pendeen Watch lighthouse, where there are sometimes tours of the unique siren and its associated machinery. Cornwall's famous antiquarian Willam Borlase and his descendant, archaeologist William Copeland Borlase, were both born in the historic manor house just off-route, itself the site of some fascinating prehistoric buildings. The sandy beach at Portheras Cove features wrecks and smugglers, and the holy well at Trewellard once doubled up as a laundry and was a useful source of medicinal...

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  • Penzance from Marazion - 2.2 miles (3.6 km)

    Penzance Photographer Julia Waters (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Easy

    An easy walk from Marazion into Penzance, giving great views across Mounts Bay to St Michael’s Mount, the Lizard and Mousehole. It is especially good in autumn, when the Bird Reserve at Marazion attracts rare migrants such as bitterns and water rails, and the flocks of swallows hunting flying ants sometimes draw the attention of a passing hobby, an unusual bird of prey. For a longer walk, see the Penzance via Marazion Marsh Walk.

    This walk is particularly good for dogs as it passes...

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  • Penzance to Marazion seafront walk - 2.7 miles (4.3 km)

    St Michael's Mount and beyond from the air. Photographer David Foker, Knaphill, Woking
    Easy

    An easy walk from Penzance (or Marazion) that gives great views across Mounts Bay to St Michael’s Mount, the Lizard and Mousehole. It is especially good in autumn, when the Bird Reserve at Marazion attracts rare migrants such as bitterns and water rails, and the flocks of swallows hunting flying ants sometimes draw the attention of a passing hobby, an unusual bird of prey.

    This walk is particularly good for dogs as it passes a beach and pubs where dogs are welcome. Have...

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  • Penzance Town Trail - 2.8 miles (4.5 km)

    Jubilee Pool, Penzance, looking towards Newlyn Photographer Sue Searle (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Easy

    A tale of admirals and smugglers, judges and rebels, chapels and piggeries, Iron Age and Art Deco, all lavishly illustrated in a host of fascinating features in this leisurely stroll around the streets of Old Penzance.

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  • Perranuthnoe - 2.3 miles (3.6 km)

    Looking back at Marazion and St Michael's Mount. Photographer Jennifer Rowlandson, Tiverton.
    Easy

    An easy walk on mostly level ground, with spectacular coastal views ranging from Lizard Point to St Michael’s Mount. The return route is on green lanes travelling inland to Perranuthnoe and its medieval church, passing through the patchwork landscape of an ancient field system dotted with disused copper and silver mines, including Wheal Trenow, once visited by Prince Albert, who wanted to watch the enormous cylinder engine at work.

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  • Porthkidney Sands - 2.0 miles (3.2 km)

    St Ives from Porth Kidney Sands Photographer Julia Waters (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Easy

    A short walk alongside the railway line high above St Ives Bay, through an area noted for rare wildflowers and migratory birds. A number of Celtic saints are said to have established chapels here in ancient times, and the old pilgrim route St Michael's Way follows a parallel path across the railway, while an eighteenth century St Ives mayor set up his own eccentric tradition at an obelisk along the way.

    Porthkidney Sands is a dog friendly beach. Have a look at our Top...

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A selection of moderate walks - all of them ranging from 2 to 3 miles in length.

  • A Castle and a Cross - 2.2 miles (3.5 km)

    Always shut gates. Holnicote Estate. Photographer David Pattie, Devon.
    Moderate

    A short walk through picturesque woodland bright with wildflowers in the spring, and vivid at the end of the year in its autumn colours. The route passes a 19th-century memorial cross, coming out onto open heathland with far-reaching views and a well-preserved prehistoric enclosure. Children will love to explore the woods and the ancient ramparts and ditches of the Iron Age hillfort. Take a picnic!

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  • Babbacombe & Oddicombe - 2.2 miles (3.6 km)

    Torquay Photographer Martina Poletti (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Moderate

    A short but fairly strenuous walk on one of Britain's highest cliff-top promenades, but you can avoid the long and steep downhill section by riding down on the famous funicular railway, built in 1926 and still carrying a quarter of a million passengers a year! This is a very important area geologically and it is rich in wildlife, with 35 nationally scarce species to be found in a grassland habitat found nowhere else in the world. Children will be fascinated by the cliff railway...

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  • Barna Barrow History Walk - 2.5 miles (4.1 km)

    Foreland Point Lighthouse Photographer Sabine Krüger (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Moderate

    A high walk with spectacular views over the Bristol Channel in several directions, and three small hills that between them mimic breathtaking mountain scenery. A whistle-stop tour of human activity through several millennia is included en route! 

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  • Bedruthan Steps Circular - 2.7 miles (4.4 km)

    Porthcothan. Photographer Jennifer Rowlandson, Tiverton.
    Moderate

    A circular walk (including the bus journey), passing sandy beaches and dramatic cliffs before reaching the iconic Bedruthan Steps. A good walk in spring, when colonies of seabirds nest among clumps of pink-headed thrift on the cliffs and the coastal grasslands high above the bright sea are dotted with the blue stars of spring squill.

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  • Bossington Hill - 2.9 miles (4.6 km)

    Selworthy Sands below Bossington Hill. Photographer Dennis Harker, Somerset.
    Moderate

    A bracing walk over a rounded hill with spectacular views in every direction, from Dunkery Beacon in the south to the Welsh coast in the north, with headlands lining up one behind the other all the way down the Exmoor coastline. It is particularly breathtaking in the spring, when birds call from the blossoming bushes and the distant views are hazy in the bright air. A good romp for children, who will love the open space at the top and its tank training history. It...

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  • Bratton Ball - 2.8 miles (4.5 km)

    Moderate

    A lovely woodland walk, after a stroll downhill through open pastureland. There are bird's-eye views over the lush green valley below, from Minehead in the east to Porlock in the west, and across the way to the brooding Dunkery Beacon, Exmoor's highest hill.

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  • Carbis Bay Station - Lelant - 2.0 miles (3.2 km)

    St Ives from Porth Kidney Sands Photographer Julia Waters (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Moderate

    A walk to blow away the cobwebs, travelling alongside the railway line high above St Ives Bay, through an area noted for rare wildflowers and migratory birds. A number of Celtic saints are said to have established chapels here in ancient times, and the old pilgrim route St Michael's Way follows a parallel path across the railway, while an eighteenth century St Ives mayor set up his own eccentric tradition at an obelisk along the way. There is not too much ascent or descent...

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  • Hawker's Hut - 2.2 miles (3.5 km)

    Hawker's Hut. Photographer Jennifer Rowlandson, Tiverton.
    Moderate

    One of the most delightful surprises on the Coast Path is the little driftwood hut built by the eccentric Victorian vicar of Morwenstow, the Reverend Hawker, who liked to smoke a pipe of opium here now and then with his literary pals Charles Dickens and Alfred Lord Tennyson. It is easy to understand why he chose this spot for it, when you make your way down from the picturesque church to the high cliffs above the pounding Atlantic, returning along the wooded valley at Tidna...

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  • Legacy Trail 6 - Around Verne Nature Reserve and West Weares - 2.8 miles (4.5 km)

    Chesil Beach. Photographer Mike Pike, Dorset.
    Moderate

    Enjoy parts of the South West Coast Path as this Legacy trail walk follows in the footsteps of the quarrymen and their wagons of stone on the route of the original Merchant's Railway. There are terrific views of Chesil Beach, Portland Harbour and the Ridgeway. 

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  • Legacy Trail 9 - Portland Bill - 2.3 miles (3.7 km)

    Portland Bill Lighthouse. Photographer Ewan Brammall, Isle of Wight.
    Moderate

    This walk explores both the east and west coasts in a lovely varied walk. The area is great for wildlife both out at sea and inland and has a fascinating history. Bottlenose dolphins can sometimes be spotted riding along the edge of the Portland Bill tidal race as well as seabirds such as gannets and shearwaters. In spring and autumn you’ll find lots of people watching birds, as this is one of the key areas in the country to see and enjoy bird migrations...

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  • Little Hangman - 2.1 miles (3.3 km)

    Combe Martin Bandstand Photographer Rob Kendall (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Moderate

    A breathtaking walk in both senses of the word, with tremendous views over Combe Martin Bay and inland, and a gentle stroll downhill through an area once famous for its silver mines. A great walk in autumn, when the rusty bracken bristles with banks of purple heather.

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  • Lulworth Cove & The Fossil Forest - 2.2 miles (3.6 km)

    View towards Durdle Door Photographer Margaret Hemmings (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Moderate

    A short walk around Lulworth Cove, visiting the dramatic Fossil Forest, the petrified remains of a cypress forest growing in a swamp on the edge of a warm lagoon in the Jurassic period when dinosaurs roamed the earth. The forest is within the Lulworth Firing Range and so can only be visited when the range is open (most weekends and school holidays - click here for precise dates).

    A good walk for children, who will be fascinated by the rock formations and the fossil forest, as...

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  • Marsland Valley Nature Reserve - 2.7 miles (4.4 km)

    Welcombe Mouth. Photographer Jennifer Rowlandson, Tiverton.
    Moderate

    A short but sharp walk around Marsland Mouth, where the mill leat straddling the Devon/Cornwall border flows past the old mill and tumbles to the rocky beach in a cascade of water. This wonderfully remote area of woodland, heathland and maritime grassland was first turned into a nature reserve by chocolate magnate Christopher Cadbury. Its variety of habitats supports a wide range of birds and mammals, including the rare and elusive dormouse. In summer the woods ring with birdsong, and the abundance of wildflowers...

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  • Moor Wood - 2.5 miles (4.0 km)

    Minehead sunrise Photographer Bob Small (2013 Photo Competition entry)
    Moderate

    Leaving from Minehead's harbour, this walk climbs steadily through mature woodland teeming with wildlife. At the top of the hill it loops through Moor Wood, used for tank training by the American and Canadian troops stationed here in the Second World War, before dropping back into Minehead via Higher Town, where the thatched cottages are clustered around a fourteenth-century church. A good walk for children, who will love stumbling upon the wartime relics in the woods. It is a lovely walk in autumn, as...

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  • Porthcurno from Porthgwarra - 2.8 miles (4.5 km)

    Porthgwarra and the Lookout Station in the background Photographer Michael Pravida
    Moderate

    From England's most southwesterly cove the Coast Path travels through an area of open heathland, high above an area of spectacular granite towers and buttresses fringed with wildflowers. Carrying on down ancient steps above a secluded sandy beach, it passes the holy well of a medieval saint, still used for baptisms, before continuing into Porthcurno, once the heart of the British Empire's communications network. Here the Minack Theatre perches high above another beach where turquoise water laps on white sand, with the headland...

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  • Start Point and Great Mattiscombe Sand - 2.2 miles (3.6 km)

    Start Point looking East Photographer Tony Velterop (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Moderate

    A perfect route for children, who will love this short but adventurous walk over a dragon's tail of spiny crags. There are wide-ranging views over the wide sweep of Start Bay as you drop down to the lighthouse at the tip of Start Point, and then the path travels over rock and coastal heathland to a secluded sandy beach, reached only on foot from the Coast Path. On a good day, it is the perfect place for a picnic. The narrow path is rocky...

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  • The Donkey Sanctuary Walk - 2.7 miles (4.3 km)

    Higher Dunscombe Cliff. Photographer Ian Killick
    Moderate

    Much of the land around Weston is dedicated to the welfare of donkeys, as you will hear when you take the woodland walk down through the valley to the shingle beach below, with its gold and yellow cliffs. Heading inland again you walk through the fields where their fodder is grown, and along a beautiful memorial lane planted with trees and furnished with benches. An ideal walk for children, who will love the tiny shingle beach as well as the donkeys.

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  • Weston Plats - 2.3 miles (3.6 km)

    Sparkling Sea, taken from the Coast Path in Sidmouth, Devon. Photographer Susan Turk, Somerset.
    Moderate

    A short loop around Weston Plats, a haven for wildlife and the scene of a thriving market garden industry a hundred years ago. Today the 'plats' (or plots of land) have been unearthed from the scrub which covered them after they fell into disuse. Take time to go on down to the beach with its spectacular red and gold shingle and cliffs.

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  • Wheal Coates - 2.9 miles (4.7 km)

    going from Trevaunance Cove to Chapel Porth Photographer Cavaliere Angelo (2012 Photo Competition entry)
    Moderate

    A short walk with a gentle climb beside a stream, visiting Wheal Coates, one of Cornwall's most iconic mines, perched high on the sheer red cliffs above Chapel Porth beach. Check out the tide times before you leave, so that you can explore the long sandy beach on a falling tide, when its fascinating rock formations, multi-coloured caves and well-stocked rockpools are at their best. If the weather's good, bring a picnic and enjoy the stunning scenery used as a location for many...

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  • Wood Combe - 2.8 miles (4.5 km)

    Moderate

    A short walk that is nonetheless strenuous in places. following a delightful path around the southern edge of North Hill with spectacular views down over the tranquil green pastureland spread out below the woods. In the valley below some of the houses and fields date back to medieval times.

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A selection of challenging walks - all of them ranging from 2 to 3 miles in length.

  • Boscastle Farm Shop - Beeny Cliff - 2.0 miles (3.2 km)

    Minster Church
    Challenging

    The South West Coast Path is the long-distance walking route which completely encircles the South West Peninsula, giving access to the finest coastal scenery the country can offer. The Boscastle Farm Shop is ideally located for some short explorations of the fabulous scenery of the South West Coast Path in this part of North Cornwall. If you've had a taste of the local produce, now try a taste of the local landscape!

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  • Heddon's Mouth Cleave - 2.8 miles (4.5 km)

    Heddons Valley. Photographer Emma Barrett, Gosport
    Challenging

    A short but challenging walk up into a wilderness full of wildlife, high above an inspirational landscape of sea and scree, with steep-sided valleys plunging to a stream flowing gently through peaceful woodland.

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  • Trentishoe Down - 2.4 miles (3.9 km)

    Challenging

    A short but challenging walk through moorland, heathland and woodland, with coastal views over dramatically plunging hillsides and out across the Bristol Channel. Trentishoe was remote enough for smugglers to hide their contraband in the church tower and their stables, and in the 1970s it was a popular venue for Glastonbury-style music festivals, where the concept of 'sustainable living' was already being promoted.

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  • Worthy Wood - 2.8 miles (4.5 km)

    Ash Farm near Porlock. Photographer Jennifer Rowlandson, Tiverton.
    Challenging

    A woodland walk with tantalising sea views between the trees, climbing between the two dramatic hills which guard the western approaches of Porlock Bay and dropping gently back downhill past the tiny tin-hut church of St Nicholas in Porlock Weir. A lovely walk in spring, when the trees are fresh and the air is bright and there is blossom on the bushes, and in autumn, when the leaves start to turn and small birds and mammals scurry around harvesting their winter stores.

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