Walk - Bay Tor Park Hotel - Cockington

6.2 miles (9.9 km)

Bay Tor Park Hotel Bay Tor Park Hotel

Moderate -

Taking in the historic, picturesque village of Cockington this walk takes you through green fields and wooded combes with a beautiful view from the outer reaches of the Cockington Estate down across this hidden valley which is now a Country Park. Back in Cockington take a horse and carriage ride to the South West Coast Path in Livermead followed by a brief walk back to Torquay Station.

There are a range of wonderful places to lay your head near the Coast Path for a well-earned sleep. From large and luxurious hotels, to small and personable B&B's, as well as self-catering options and campsites. The businesses that support the Path, where you've chosen to visit, are listed here.

The Millbrook B&B

Excellent en-suite accommodation just 800 metres from Torquay sea front, wi-fi & on-site parking, garden. Guest lounge and Conservatory.

The Cleveland Bed and Breakfast

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE * FREE WIFI * OFF-STREET PARKING The Cleveland is ideally located for access to Torquay and the South West Coast Path

Garway Lodge Guest House

Enjoy a 4 Star Award-Winning guest house bed & breakfast. Situated in Torquay. Early Breakfasts are available upon request.

The Haldon Guest House

Situated 3 minutes walk from Paignton beach, pier and town centre, we are ideally located for exploring the beautiful English Riviera and beyond. Tasty breakfast and a sunny garden.

The Clifton at Paignton

Steve and Freda look forward to welcoming you to the Clifton, which is ideally located, just off the sea front. Around the corner from shops and stations. Within easy reach of Dartmoor.

Payge Stay Torquay

A beautiful, luxurious seaview Apartment in the exclusive area of Meadfoot, Torquay. Sleeps 2

Aveland House

Close to the Coast Path. All en-suite rooms,Free Wi Fi. See our website www.avelandhouse.co.uk for more details

Coastguard Cottage

Small, cosy cottage accommodatioon with all rooms en-suite and with wifi. Close to many amenities. A substantial breakfast is provided.

Beacon House B&B

Nestled in the harbour bowl, we command breathtaking views of harbour, marina and beyond the breakwater, 4 x en suite bedrooms, sumptuous breakfast. A warm welcome awaits.

Sea Tang Guest House

Friendly, family run guest house located a few steps form the sea with beautiful views across Torbay.

Westbury Guest House

A 14th century Georgian Guest House with great charm and character. Short level walk from the harbour, pubs and restaurants.

Brixham House

A friendly welcome, renowned for excellent breakfasts, approx 10 minute walk from the Coast Path and also on the bus route.

You'll be spoilt for choice for where to eat and drink along the Path. With lots of local seasonal food on offer, fresh from the farm, field and waters. Try our local ales, ciders, wines and spirits, increasing in variety by the year, as you sit in a cosy pub, fine dining restaurant or chilled café on the beach. The businesses that support the Path, where you've chosen to visit, are listed here.

Terrace Cafe Bar at Living Coasts

Free entry for non-visitors. Come in anytime for family friendly, freshly prepared local food & drink with panoramic views over the Bay

The Breakwater Bistro

A family run bistro with magnificent panoramic sea views and fresh, seasonal menu. Daytime and evening bistro.

What is on your list of things to do when you visit the Path? From walking companies, to help you tailor your visit, with itineraries and experts to enhance your visit, to baggage transfer companies and visitor attractions there are lots to people and places to help you decide what you'd like to do. The businesses that support the Path, where you've chosen to visit, are listed here.

English Riviera Bid Company

The English Riviera BID company is the destination marketing organisation for the English Riviera which includes over 1000 tourism businesses. It promotes the England's Seafood Coast brand and coordinates the Seafood FEAST festival

Living Coasts

Playful Penguins, Otters, Octopus, Seals and much more. Cafe with panoramic sea views- free for non-visitors

Paignton Zoo

Over 2000 animals spread across 80 acres, you're in for a really wild time. Rain or shine, enjoy a fun-filled day out.

Interactive Elevation

Route Description

Travel to the start of the walk can be by car or on foot. From the Tor Park Hotel head down Vansittart Road towards the sea. At the junction turn right and immediately right again down Mill Lane. Go under the bridge. At the traffic lights turn left onto Avenue Road. At the next traffic lights go straight on down The King’s Drive. At the seafront traffic lights turn right onto Torbay Road. Shortly at the next traffic lights turn right in front of the Grand Hotel before turning left into the station car park. If preferred, the first part of the walk from Torquay Station to Torquay Harbour can be done by open top bus.

  1. From Torquay Station head towards the Grand Hotel, crossing the road to the seafront. Facing the sea turn right and follow the South West Coast Path past Corbyn Head towards Paignton.

Corbyn’s (Saxon for crooked) Head had a natural arch until it fell in 1822, a second arch collapsed during a 1936 storm.  Richard Mallock MP established and maintained his own small artillery unit here in the late nineteenth century. In the Second World War members of the Home Guard were killed here while test-firing a piece of Japanese-made artillery.

  1. Cross the road at the pedestrian crossing traffic lights and turn right into Cockington Lane. Follow the lane under the railway bridge until you reach the double mini roundabouts.
  1. Turn right and then immediately before what looks like an old bus shelter, turn left onto the waymarked route, the Torbay-Totnes Trail. Look out for the blue signs that direct you along the valley. Eventually the path crosses over a stream and a low stile and out onto Cockington Lane near Lanscombe House. The lane then leads into Cockington Village.

Cockington Court was the home of the Cary family from the 14th century until the 17th century before belonging to the Mallock family. The current house dates largely from the 16th and 17th centuries. Originally, the centre of Cockington village had been sited next to the church and Cockington Court. However, in the early years of the 1800s the Lord of the Manor, Roger Mallock, decided he wanted a view from the Court uncluttered by buildings. He therefore had the barns and the cottages knocked down and a new village rebuilt out of sight, but in "picturesque" style. Cockington Court is run by Torbay Development Agency. The estate grounds are managed by the Torbay Coast and Countryside Trust. There is a craft centre and restaurant here. Most of the buildings in today's Cockington therefore date back to 1800-1810, although several of the farm buildings, including the 500 year old Cockington Forge, pre-date the building of the new village.

Having enjoyed the village of Cockington, continue walking up Cockington Lane, passing between the Drum Inn and School House.

The Drum Inn was the last building to be constructed within the village. In 1936 the world famous architect Sir Edwin Lutyens designed the pub to be the focal point of the village. 

  1. Fifty yards further up the road the junction with an ancient sunken lane marks the site of an earlier village inn. Take the path, Bewhay Lane, on your left. Cut deep into the red Devon rock, the path takes you up away from the village and Torbay and onto an open rural landscape of fields and ancient hedgerows. The lane gives way to a footpath before dropping down to pass through the farmyard of Stantor Farm.
  1. At Stantor Farm join the farm track which takes a left turn out of the farmyard to join a short section of the old Totnes Road. This was once the old highway from Cockington to Totnes. It is now a relatively peaceful sunken lane well clothed in fern and seasonal wild flowers. At the road turn left. Three hundred yards on, take a footpath which leads off to the right into Scadson Woods and soon begins to follow the line of the Hollicombe stream.

Scadson is an ancient word originating from a Saxon derivation meaning ‘in the shadow of’. The woodland is indeed mystic and beautiful providing a carpet of springtime bluebells and wild garlic and was once an important source of raw materials for numerous rural tasks.

  1. At the first footpath junction, take the left fork and climb gently up through the woods and out once more onto open pastures.

The field to your right was once part of a rabbit warren where rabbits were raised for both their meat and fur.

  1. On reaching a crossroads of footpaths, continue straight ahead, dropping down to the recently renovated Warren Barn.

You will notice an area of newly planted deciduous woodland to your right. Manscombe Woods was probably planted in the 1800s for the purpose of rearing and shooting pheasant. The wall which runs around it dates back much earlier - to the 1600s, if not before. Much of the woodland was blown down by the storms of 1990, and it has had to be cleared and replanted. 

  1. The route now turns to follow the edge of Manscombe Woods down the valley to the Gamekeeper’s Cottage, situated on the boundary of Cockington’s more managed garden area.

Gamekeeper's Cottage nestles in the shadow of Manscombe Woods. The earliest record of the cottage is 1517, and the last gamekeeper to live here was in the early 1900s. The cottage was severely damaged by arsonists in 1990, and only the shell was left standing. It has since been restored and is now used as an environmental education centre. The intriguing timber slatted area, at the end of the building just beneath the roof was used to hang pheasants after a shoot in preparation for the cook to use up at Cockington Court house.

From here it is a sedate walk along surfaced paths either to Cockington Court via Lower Lodge or back to the village centre.

From the village retrace your steps along Cockington Lane to the path leading through the water meadows. Emerge onto the road at the double mini roundabout. Turn left to head up Old Mill Road before quickly turning right into Hennapyn Road.

  1. Follow Hennapyn back to Torquay Station, crossing over the railway bridge and turning left, by the Grand Hotel, into Torquay Station.

Alternatively catch a bus back to the station or take a Horse and Carriage ride from the village to Torquay seafront near the Livermead House Hotel. From there it is a short walk along the South West Coast Path back towards Torquay Station. From the Station make your back to the Tor Park Hotel following the directions at the start of this walk.

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